The Second Anniversary of the Egyptian Revolution

Protesters in Tahrir Square, Cairo. Photo by Patrick O. Strickland.
Wracked with protests and violent clashes in several cities, the second anniversary of Egypt’s January 25, 2011 Revolution portrays the continuous struggle Egyptians face in maintaining the principles that toppled autocratic ex-president, Hosni Mubarak. As current President Mohamed Morsi pushes forward with a new constitution, Egyptians fear that the regime will only become more oppressive and autocratic. As tens of thousands of people took to the streets, demanding Morsi’s resignation, the President declared a state of emergency in three cities.


Meanwhile, days before the revolution’s second anniversary, Morsi’s Muslim Brotherhood unveiled a reformative campaign proposing to create social services for one million Egyptians. The new campaign, called ‘Building Egypt Together’ stresses that “Egypt is for all Egyptians, and that the Brotherhood’s strategy aims to protect the revolution and to complete institution building.” Said the Brotherhood’s media spokesman, Dr. Ahmed Arif.  

Amidst the Muslim Brotherhood’s new campaign kickoff, New York-based Human Rights Watch and London-based Amnesty International called on President Morsi to publish the findings of his committee-appointed investigation into alleged abuses committed by security forces during the country’s revolution. Two years later, many perpetrators of torture, rape, and murder still walk free in Egypt. At least 846 protestors died during Egypt’s revolution.

Citing further dissidence, three Coptic churches asserted their withdrawal from national political discussions with the presidency. The churches cited “futility of dialogue.” President Morsi had called upon Egypt’s religious bodies to help draft amendments to the new constitution. However, after Morsi’s Shura Council violated agreements made during the national dialogue sessions by passing a new elections law, other parties are seeking to submit their withdrawals also.

Elyse

Diwaniyya Contributor

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